slider 1 road side storage dry

slider 2 road side harvestingg pond
slider 3 Dust from feeder roads – kopie
slider 4 percolation pits along the road
slider 5 Ponding at culvert in road DSC08234
slider 6 road side waterlogging
Slider 7 road side water harvesting storage pond

Governance

A strong body of governance is crucial for the development and implementation of roads for water. Here you can find articles on governance and on how to establish a strong collaboration between different disciplines and levels. We welcome you to share your ideas and experiences with us on this topic!

Gender mainstreaming in rural road construction/usage in Ethiopia: impact and implications

This study investigated the engagement of men, women spouses (WS) and women heads-of-household (WHH) in the planning and construction of rural roads in two Ethiopian districts of Tigray and Amhara, and the differential impacts of rural roads on the mobility and transport of men, WS and WHH. The fieldwork established that there is a strong demand among women for both road use and employment opportunities in road construction. Compared with men, women demonstrated specific priorities with respect to rural road development, such as access to ambulance services, flat, wide and levelled roads, and improved access to means of transport. Although women’s concerns have been slowly but steadily pushed up the planning agenda, there are gaps between gender provision in rural road development and implementation. The benefits of roads for women can be enhanced by targeting gender mainstreaming provisions to take into account the specific travel and transport needs of WS and WHH. Read the paper on this link: Gender mainstreaming in rural road construction

World Bank Report: Lifelines – The Resilient Infrastructure Opoortunity

According to Lifelines, a new report from by the World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, the net benefit of building more resilient infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries would be $4.2 trillion, with $4 in benefit for each $1 invested. 

Solutions to improve the resilience of infrastructure exist and investments to do so are both sound and profitable. What does this resilient infrastructure look like? It could be digging deeper foundations, using alternative materials, building flood protection, strengthening electrical poles and cell towers, improving road design, and building stronger water treatment plants.

But it is also necessary to look beyond each individual asset and build more resilient systems and networks. Building redundancy in networks, that is by increasing the number of connections that serve a community, for instance, can be a gamechanger. A city that is accessible through multiple roads and powered through multiple transmission lines is less likely to find itself isolated or without power when a devastating storm strike.

Green Roads Initiative

The presentation on the Green Roads Initiative can be downloaded here

Roads for Water: Scaling up

Some of the success factors on Roads for Water Programme under the Global Resilience Partnership Scaling Up Roads for Water

How to integrate Roads for Water and Flood Resilience

Find 2 posters explaining about how Roads for Water and Flood Resilience can be integrated in Climate Change programs, and in road design and construction. 

Presented in World Bank Transport Learning Event

poster1 integrated climate change

poster2 integrated road design an construction

How to create 500.000 jobs in Ethiopia?

This policy note digs into the motorbike-transport business and how this can have a major impact for Ethiopia. Both for youth in terms of job creation and for all communities living in rural areas for increased and improved mobility. 

Motorbikes are widespread in many African countries, proving a great opportunity for Ethiopia. 

Read the practical note here

 

Roads for Resilience Report Tajikistan

Integrating climate change adaptation and water management in the design and construction of roads.  

Assessment of Opportunities in Tajikistan

Find the report here

 

 

Inclusive and Green Rural Roads – Beyond Connectivity, Accelerating Green Growth

This presentation aims to contribute to the evolving thinking on how in particular rural roads and transport can better contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals and what practical measures could be taken to make rural roads and transport ‘greener’ and more ‘inclusive’ – with a special attention on vulnerable groups: women and unemployed youth. 
 
The presentation uses research findings undertaken under the ReCAP Gender Mainstreaming Program in Ethiopia. It looks at how rural roads and transport can unblock access to rural goods and services; how it triggers direct labour opportunities and skills development, how it triggers the development of local business and how in particular roads can change the physical environment in a beneficial way.

Access the presentation (.ppt) here and the pdf  here 

Road Water Management at 2nd IRF Africa Regional Congress, Namibia

The Beneficial Use of Road Water for Climate Resilience and Asset Management. 

Presentation done at 2nd IRF Africa Regional Congress, Windhoek, Namibia. 

Presentation IRF Namibia_IRF2nd_ Water with Roads

Vaguely Right or Exactly Wrong: Measuring the (Spatial) Distribution of Land Resources, Income and Wealth in Rural Ethiopia

Land ties people to specific localities featuring different levels of accessibility and natural endowments; it is therefore related in various ways to matters of inequality. Drawing from economics and human geography, we explore the multifaceted and complex nature of inequality. Our case study takes place in rural Tigray, Ethiopia. Quantitative data analysis is used to reveal (spatial) income distribution patterns between statistically representative population groups. Qualitative data are then used to describe the productive activities of these groups, their respective processes of material asset accumulation or losses, and how their economic activities are affected by location. The paper concludes that, where measures of the distribution of income falls short, we require other tools that will help us reveal patterns: (1) of material wealth distribution; (2) of control over production; and (3) of the unaccounted value created within the household or derived from the natural environment. View full text here

 

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logo_mm copy mekelle-university-logo ERA logo Tigray agriculture (not sure) amhara agriculture bureau